Urban Forest Strategy

Consultation has concluded

Your say on the future of Mornington Peninsula’s urban forest

The Shire has a rich and unique landscape of coasts and hills and substantial native biodiversity. Although the townships of the Peninsula have more tree canopy than most other areas of metropolitan Melbourne, tree canopy is not evenly spread across the Peninsula. There are large differences in tree canopy cover between different townships (ranging from 14% canopy cover in Safety Beach to 68% in Arthurs Seat) and between different areas within townships.

Why our urban forest is important

The urban forest in Mornington Peninsula is the trees and other vegetation, and the soil and water that supports them, in the urban areas of townships across the Peninsula. It includes trees on all land uses, and ownerships (public and private). Tree canopy in urban areas provides many benefits. It cools and shades us, protecting our most vulnerable residents from extreme heat, increasing opportunities for people to get outside on hot days to exercise or go shopping. Access to urban nature and greening improves mental health and happiness, and increases the connection people have with nature. Trees can provide important habitat and connect larger areas of habitat for native birds, marsupials and other animals.

Threats to our urban forest

The urban forest in the Peninsula is at risk from pests and diseases like myrtle rust and changes in the climate (for example increased heat stress or reduced rainfall, which leads to reduced soil moisture and water availability). Trees are also removed during urban development as the footprint of buildings increases as properties are subdivided or extended.

Our Urban Forest Strategy

The Shire has developed the draft Our Urban Forest Strategy to substantially increase resilient canopy cover across urban areas of the Peninsula. The Strategy will guide and coordinate investment and action to protect, enhance, and expand vegetation and tree canopy in urban areas.

The vision of the draft Our Urban Forest Strategy is that:

"The future Mornington Peninsula urban forest is growing, thriving and resilient, providing the diverse ecological, social and economic benefits to all people and creatures who live in the unique Peninsula forest."

Implementation of the Strategy will (over time) reduce the inequality in canopy cover by focussing planting in areas where canopy cover is currently low and communities are vulnerable to extreme heat.

The Strategy sets an ambitious, evidence-based target that 45% of the public realm (streets and parks) in urban areas is shaded by tree canopy by 2034.

Share your feedback with us by completing the survey, dragging pins on the interactive map to tell us about specific areas, or registering for our online community workshop.

Note – an updated Strategy and Appendix has been uploaded on 6th June to this page after some errors in data presentation were identified.

Your say on the future of Mornington Peninsula’s urban forest

The Shire has a rich and unique landscape of coasts and hills and substantial native biodiversity. Although the townships of the Peninsula have more tree canopy than most other areas of metropolitan Melbourne, tree canopy is not evenly spread across the Peninsula. There are large differences in tree canopy cover between different townships (ranging from 14% canopy cover in Safety Beach to 68% in Arthurs Seat) and between different areas within townships.

Why our urban forest is important

The urban forest in Mornington Peninsula is the trees and other vegetation, and the soil and water that supports them, in the urban areas of townships across the Peninsula. It includes trees on all land uses, and ownerships (public and private). Tree canopy in urban areas provides many benefits. It cools and shades us, protecting our most vulnerable residents from extreme heat, increasing opportunities for people to get outside on hot days to exercise or go shopping. Access to urban nature and greening improves mental health and happiness, and increases the connection people have with nature. Trees can provide important habitat and connect larger areas of habitat for native birds, marsupials and other animals.

Threats to our urban forest

The urban forest in the Peninsula is at risk from pests and diseases like myrtle rust and changes in the climate (for example increased heat stress or reduced rainfall, which leads to reduced soil moisture and water availability). Trees are also removed during urban development as the footprint of buildings increases as properties are subdivided or extended.

Our Urban Forest Strategy

The Shire has developed the draft Our Urban Forest Strategy to substantially increase resilient canopy cover across urban areas of the Peninsula. The Strategy will guide and coordinate investment and action to protect, enhance, and expand vegetation and tree canopy in urban areas.

The vision of the draft Our Urban Forest Strategy is that:

"The future Mornington Peninsula urban forest is growing, thriving and resilient, providing the diverse ecological, social and economic benefits to all people and creatures who live in the unique Peninsula forest."

Implementation of the Strategy will (over time) reduce the inequality in canopy cover by focussing planting in areas where canopy cover is currently low and communities are vulnerable to extreme heat.

The Strategy sets an ambitious, evidence-based target that 45% of the public realm (streets and parks) in urban areas is shaded by tree canopy by 2034.

Share your feedback with us by completing the survey, dragging pins on the interactive map to tell us about specific areas, or registering for our online community workshop.

Note – an updated Strategy and Appendix has been uploaded on 6th June to this page after some errors in data presentation were identified.