Our Coast Our Future

Round two consultation now open!
Help us make decisions on Coastal Hazard Exposures and Risks by sharing your feedback in the survey below.


Through the Shire’s Our Coast Our Future, we’re developing a long-term plan to manage coastal hazard impacts across our region.

The Shire was awarded funding through the state government’s Victoria’s Resilient Coast grants program. This initiative aims to assist coastal land managers to deliver strategic coastal hazard risk management and adaptation.


The study area

Our Coast Our Future will include all our coastal communities along the Peninsula. We have grouped these communities into five areas. This allows us to explore community values, coastal processes and coastal hazards at a more localised scale.

Click on a region below to look a further detail related to your local area or favourite beach.

A strategic approach to adaptation

The outcomes of this work allow us to better understand the region’s coastal hazards and possible implications for our local communities, now and into the future. With improved understanding of hazards and potential at-risk areas along our coastline, we can work to identify different ways to manage these locations through adaptation.

Our Coast Our Future will include the development of a Coastal Strategy to guide our adaptation planning and its implementation.

Understanding coastal hazards

The coastal hazards we’re assessing include erosion (sand loss), inundation (flooding) and changes to groundwater.

What are coastal hazards?

  • Storm-tide inundation: temporary flooding of low-lying coastal land from elevated sea levels, often due to storm events;
  • Coastal erosion: winds, waves, and coastal currents shift sediment (sand) away from the shoreline
  • Permanent inundation: long-term inundation due to sea level rise (such as regular flooding from tides)
  • Groundwater changes: groundwater (water table) rising nearer to the ground surface due climate change (including sea level rise). Shallow groundwater (<2m below the ground surface), is considered a hazard.

See our fact sheet series to find out more about coastal hazards.

Examining coastal hazards

We have been using range of existing coastal models, data sets and studies to estimate coastal hazards for the region. This has helped us identify areas along the Peninsula potentially impacted by different coastal hazard types for a range of current and future conditions (including sea level rise).

We have combined outputs from various coastal hazard models for the region’s marine and coastal areas. The estimated hazards are shown on the Our Coast Our Future hazard maps (see these maps in our document library).

We’re using these maps to determine coastal areas across the Mornington Peninsula that may be exposed to coastal inundation (flooding), erosion, sea level rise or changes to groundwater. The maps allow us to think about:

  • what and where the hazards are
  • when hazards may occur
  • how they change over time

Our next steps are to assess risk and vulnerability of our coastal communities to determine where adaptation (hazard mitigation) might be necessary.

As part of our earlier engagement activities and events, we established a good appreciation of community coastal values and experiences. We’re now using a risk assessment to explore how coastal hazards might interact and impact on these important values, uses and infrastructure in the Peninsula's coastal areas.

We will be sharing these results with the community in the coming months. We will also be discussing the role of adaptation in managing risk.

Round two consultation now open!
Help us make decisions on Coastal Hazard Exposures and Risks by sharing your feedback in the survey below.


Through the Shire’s Our Coast Our Future, we’re developing a long-term plan to manage coastal hazard impacts across our region.

The Shire was awarded funding through the state government’s Victoria’s Resilient Coast grants program. This initiative aims to assist coastal land managers to deliver strategic coastal hazard risk management and adaptation.


The study area

Our Coast Our Future will include all our coastal communities along the Peninsula. We have grouped these communities into five areas. This allows us to explore community values, coastal processes and coastal hazards at a more localised scale.

Click on a region below to look a further detail related to your local area or favourite beach.

A strategic approach to adaptation

The outcomes of this work allow us to better understand the region’s coastal hazards and possible implications for our local communities, now and into the future. With improved understanding of hazards and potential at-risk areas along our coastline, we can work to identify different ways to manage these locations through adaptation.

Our Coast Our Future will include the development of a Coastal Strategy to guide our adaptation planning and its implementation.

Understanding coastal hazards

The coastal hazards we’re assessing include erosion (sand loss), inundation (flooding) and changes to groundwater.

What are coastal hazards?

  • Storm-tide inundation: temporary flooding of low-lying coastal land from elevated sea levels, often due to storm events;
  • Coastal erosion: winds, waves, and coastal currents shift sediment (sand) away from the shoreline
  • Permanent inundation: long-term inundation due to sea level rise (such as regular flooding from tides)
  • Groundwater changes: groundwater (water table) rising nearer to the ground surface due climate change (including sea level rise). Shallow groundwater (<2m below the ground surface), is considered a hazard.

See our fact sheet series to find out more about coastal hazards.

Examining coastal hazards

We have been using range of existing coastal models, data sets and studies to estimate coastal hazards for the region. This has helped us identify areas along the Peninsula potentially impacted by different coastal hazard types for a range of current and future conditions (including sea level rise).

We have combined outputs from various coastal hazard models for the region’s marine and coastal areas. The estimated hazards are shown on the Our Coast Our Future hazard maps (see these maps in our document library).

We’re using these maps to determine coastal areas across the Mornington Peninsula that may be exposed to coastal inundation (flooding), erosion, sea level rise or changes to groundwater. The maps allow us to think about:

  • what and where the hazards are
  • when hazards may occur
  • how they change over time

Our next steps are to assess risk and vulnerability of our coastal communities to determine where adaptation (hazard mitigation) might be necessary.

As part of our earlier engagement activities and events, we established a good appreciation of community coastal values and experiences. We’re now using a risk assessment to explore how coastal hazards might interact and impact on these important values, uses and infrastructure in the Peninsula's coastal areas.

We will be sharing these results with the community in the coming months. We will also be discussing the role of adaptation in managing risk.

Page last updated: 14 Jun 2024, 09:26 AM